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    CHAPTER X.
  --  STILL ANOTHER SOUTHERN HOUSEHOLD.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XII.
  --  THE LONG-LOST MOTHER HEARD FROM.

Mattison, Hiram
Louisa Picquet, the Octoroon

- CHAPTER XI. -- DOMESTIC PURITY IN GEORGIA.

CHAPTER XI.
DOMESTIC PURITY IN GEORGIA.


Q. --"How was it with Henry, your husband?"

A. --"Why, he hired Eliza, and rented a house, and put her in. She was a slave-woman, and took in washin'."

Q. --"How came they to part?"

A. --"Why, you see, she belong to heirs, and the property

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was sold for the money to be divided. Then a gentleman in Macon bought Eliza for himself. Then Henry felt so bad about it that, pretty soon, he went to see her. He went there with the intention of buyin' her and her baby, which was Henry's. Mr. Picquet, Henry's father, was goin' to let him have the money. So, when he got there, he found it different from what he expected. He found he could not have her any more for his wife. You see, the gentleman had bought her for himself. So my husband writ to his father that he could not get his wife, but he could buy the child. Then his father, Mr. Picquet, sent on the money, and he bought the child, and brought it away. It was about three months old, and he raised it on a bottle, work all day, and then worry with the child all night."

Q. --"Is that child yet living?"

A. --"Oh yes; she is livin' with us in Cincinnati, and the smartest one we got too. She is about thirteen or fourteen."

Q. --"Is she as white as your children?"

A. --"Oh no; she is the darkest one in the house. But her hair is straight, only little bit wavy."


    CHAPTER X.
  --  STILL ANOTHER SOUTHERN HOUSEHOLD.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XII.
  --  THE LONG-LOST MOTHER HEARD FROM.