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    CHAPTER XIII.
  --  LETTER FROM A SLAVE MOTHER.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XV.
  --  PRIVATE EFFORTS TO BUY THE MOTHER.

Mattison, Hiram
Louisa Picquet, the Octoroon

- CHAPTER XIV. -- LETTER FROM THE OWNER OF ELIZABETH.

CHAPTER XIV.
LETTER FROM THE OWNER OF ELIZABETH.


Matagorda , June 17, 1859. " Louisa ,

"I have your favor of 16th April last, and contents duly noticed.

"You seem to think that I ask you too much for your mother.

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Money would not induce me to sell her, were it not for existing circumstances. You know that she is as fine a washer, cook, and ironer as there is in the United States. It's true she is getting old, but she carries her age well, and looks as young as she did twenty years ago. I only ask you to place another of her quality and qualifications in her stead. You can not complain of this, if it's not of your power to comply with the terms. I write you to come and see her, and I pledge myself you shall not be molested either directly or indirectly, but protected to the utmost extent.

"I send you by this mail a Daguerreotype likeness of your mother and brother, which I hope you will receive. Your mother received yours in a damaged condition. Your mother and all your acquaintance are in fine health, and desire to be remembered, and would be pleased to see you."Respec'y yours, "A.C. Horton ."

The Daguerreotype mentioned above was duly received, in perfect order, and is now in the hands of Mrs. Picquet. They are both taken on one plate, mother and son, and are set forth in their best possible gear, to impress us in the north with the superior condition of the slave over the free colored people.

Just here might come in a chapter more romantic and thrilling than any thing as yet narrated in this pamphlet, but, for reasons that we must not name, it must remain unprinted for the present. The time may come, and we hope soon will come, when it may be published without prejudice to any party or interest.

From the date of the last of the preceding letters, Mrs. Picquet has received letters from her mother nearly every month, but nothing further from Mr. Horton himself, though Mrs. P. has often written him, importuning him to take less for her mother. At length, in March, 1860, she wrote to Mrs. Horton, appealing to her regard for her own mother, to talk to Col. Horton, her husband, and see if he would take less than one thousand dollars for Mrs. Ramsey. Of the results of this appeal we shall learn hereafter.

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    CHAPTER XIII.
  --  LETTER FROM A SLAVE MOTHER.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XV.
  --  PRIVATE EFFORTS TO BUY THE MOTHER.