[Home] [Book] [Expand] [Collapse] [Help]

Clear Search Expand Search


    CHAPTER XXI.
  --  SUSPECTED AND REPULSED BY A FRIEND OF THE COLORED
  --  PEOPLE.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XXIII.
  --  MORE LETTERS FROM THE MOTHER.

Mattison, Hiram
Louisa Picquet, the Octoroon

- CHAPTER XXII. -- LOUISA IS INDORSED AFRESH FROM CINCINNATI.

CHAPTER XXII.
LOUISA IS INDORSED AFRESH FROM CINCINNATI.


Being thus repulsed, and virtually accused of being an impostor, Mrs. P. felt deeply grieved, as any sensitive and virtuous woman would; but she made no reply, except to say that she believed she had one of the envelopes at the house where she was stopping. She had not thought to keep and show them as a proof that she was not an impostor, and this was the first time they had been called for; for the reader must understand that begging was new business to her, and that she had not resorted to it till all hope of getting her mother free by any other means had fled forever.

The fact of this cold repulse and alleged suspicion becoming known. H.H. Mattison, Esq., of Buffalo (a relative of the writer), told Mrs. P. to go to his house and remain till her case could be brought before the Conference. He then went to the telegraph office and telegraphed to Evans & Co., Bankers, Cincinnati, to

raster
44
whom Mrs. P. had referred him, to know if Mrs. P. resided there, and every thing was as she represented. *

(*) The object of this movement on the part of Mr. Mattison was not to satisfy the writer, or himself; but to procure fresh testimony from original sources, to either convince or silence such incredulous subjects as Rev. H. Slicer.

The telegraph operator kindly sent the message (amounting to nearly three dollars) gratuitously, and the next mail brought the following letter from W.T. Drake , Esq., of the firm of Evans & Co., and one of the first subscribers upon Mrs Picquet's book:

JASON EVANS,EVANS & CO., BANKERS.H.W. HUGHES,BRIGGS SWIFT.W.T. DRAKE.

Cincinnati , 22nd May, 1860.
"H.H. Mattison , Esq., Buffalo, N. York. " Dear Sir,

--I am in receipt of your telegram of 21st inst., and hasten to reply.

"I know Mrs. Picquet has a mother in bondage in Texas, for whom she is trying to raise sufficient money to purchase her freedom.

"I know, also, Mrs. Picquet to be a truthful, and, I trust, Christian woman. You can, therefore, place the utmost confidence in her representations to you.

"I cordially commend her to your charity, in assisting her in the humane and filial endeavor of purchasing a mother from the curse of slavery.

"A mother! Who would not brave any danger, toil, and hardship for that dear name!"I am, very truly, "W.T. Drake .

"I have just seen the husband of Mrs. Picquet. He hands me two letters from Mrs. P.'s mother, received since she has been gone. Will you please hand them to her, after reading. The master of this woman has agreed to take $100 less than is former price."

The two accompanying letters referred to will be found in the following chapter.

raster
45

    CHAPTER XXI.
  --  SUSPECTED AND REPULSED BY A FRIEND OF THE COLORED
  --  PEOPLE.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XXIII.
  --  MORE LETTERS FROM THE MOTHER.