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    VIII
  --  A FLAG OF TRUCE   Table of Contents     IX
  --  CAPTURE OF CHARLESTON

Taylor, Susie King
Reminiscences of my life in camp

- VIII -- A FLAG OF TRUCE
- Illustration

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CAPT. L. W. METCALF
CAPT. MIRON W. SAXTON CAPT. A. W. JACKSON
CORPORAL PETER WAGGALL
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41
was Major Jones, of Alabama, the other Lieutenant Scott, of South Carolina. Major Jones was very cordial to our captain, but Lieutenant Scott would not extend his hand, and stood aside, in sullen silence, looking as if he would like to take revenge then and there. Major Jones said to Captain Metcalf, "We have no one to fight for. Should I meet you again, I shall not forget we have met before." With this he extended his hand to Metcalf and bade him good-by, but Lieutenant Scott stood by and looked as cross as he possibly could. The letters were exchanged, but it seemed a mystery just how those letters got missent to the opposite sides. Captain Metcalf said he did not feel a mite comfortable while he was on the Confederate soil; as for his men, you can imagine their thoughts. I asked them how they felt on the other side, and they said, "We would have felt much better if we had had our guns with us." It was a little risky, for sometimes the flag of truce is not regarded, but even among the enemy there are some good and loyal persons.

Captain Metcalf is still living in Medford. He is 71 years old, and just as loyal to the old flag and the G. A. R. as he was from 1861 to 1866, when he was mustered out. He was a brave captain, a good officer, and was honored and beloved by all in the regiment.


    VIII
  --  A FLAG OF TRUCE   Table of Contents     IX
  --  CAPTURE OF CHARLESTON