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    CHAPTER X.
  --  Sanctification.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XII.
  --  Virginia's Work Extended.

Broughton, V.W.
Twenty Year's Experience of a Missionary

- CHAPTER XI. -- Virginia's Experience in Miss Moore's Fireside School.

CHAPTER XI.
Virginia's Experience in Miss Moore's Fireside School.


As has been stated, it seemed to be God's plan for Virginia to move her headquarters. Accordingly she and her family moved to the city of her nativity December, 1899. She found congenial associates in "Sunshine Home," the headquarters of the Fireside School. We'll call this home "The Saints' Retreat," for it served as a resting, edifying and comforting resort for our missionary after her great conflict in contending for the great doctrines of Divine Healing and Sanctification.

For three years she labored in this school as one of Miss Moore's secretaries, assistant editor of Hope, and six months as supervisor of the work. For six months Miss Moore had a colored board of directors to direct her Fireside School. At that time she planned to transfer the management of her work to the colored people, as her own physical strength was failing. At

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her suggestion that board appointed Virginia as supervisor.

The experience of that six months was altogether satisfactory; the directors held regular monthly meetings, heard the various reports of the workers as to condition of work and gave the supervisor and secretaries wise counsel and substantial encouragement whenever they came to present the work to their churches. The supervisor not only visited local churches of all denominations but the ministers' conferences and such other general bodies, either state or national, that met during those six months. Everywhere she went the work was endorsed and the literature circulated. The C. M. E. General conference met that spring in Nashville. Virginia, as supervisor of the Fireside School, was given a patient hearing. After her address many congratulations were extended her and the Fireside School recommended in most gracious terms.

Miss Moore's life was so thoroughly absorbed in her Fireside School that she was ill at ease all the while she was testing her new plan (as her letters clearly indicate). After six months she returned and made a new proposition to her board of directors relative toward their assuming the financial responsibility of the work, which responsibility she still carried per agreement. The ministers constituting her board, most of whom were carrying the great burden of church

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edifice building debt, decided that they could not assume other financial burdens; hence they all withdrew from the board and the Fireside School was again under the sole management of Miss J.P. Moore.

Virginia's experience in this work was very helpful; she regards it as her post course in Bible study for missionary activity in all its phases. The inmates of Sunshine Home at this time were earnest, devout, intelligent Christian women, whose lives were a benediction to every church in the city of Nashville in which they labored. Missionary meetings, children's meetings, Sunday school work, and house to house visiting were weekly services in which all these good women were expected to engage. Besides this the daily routine of work consisted in letter writing, mailing Hope and other literature, bookkeeping and housekeeping. The Wednesday afternoon consecration meeting was looked forward to as the special service of the week to meditate upon the deep things of God as the Holy Spirit revealed them to us in our daily Bible study; it was also a service when special prayers were offered for those blessed meetings, of sweet communions and fellowship with those of kindred minds.

Several of God's chosen and tried children, both white and colored, came to the Wednesday afternoon consecration services. We would have you know the

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three other dear young women who served as secretaries at that time; their names are Henrietta K. Patrick, Mary G. Gibson and Joanna Greenlee. Sister M. H. Flowers was then the city missionary. We never knew a controversy to disturb the love and beautiful companionship of those dear women, whom God used to do a very gracious and acceptable service in promoting the Fireside School work. Before concluding this brief report of Virginia's special experience in the Fireside School, for indirectly she has been laboring in it and for it since her first meeting Miss Moore in January, 1886, we must say the Fireside School stands for Daily Bible study and Christian living consistent with the teachings of that blessed book of God. Then of course it stands for holiness of heart and purity and cleanliness of bodily actions; as a result of surrender and obedience to God's directions given by the indwelling Holy Spirit.

God has provided the power of the Holy Spirit to keep us, and He assures us if we walk in the Spirit we will not fulfill the lusts of the flesh. Gal. 5:16. Acts 1:8. I Pet. 1:5. So wisely and righteously has this Fireside School work been managed that it has stemmed the tide of every wave of opposition. The founder ever urged her constituents to stand by their

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churches and not desert them when the spirit of dissolution and separation ran high, because of the misunderstandings and misinterpretations of the Bible teaching of holiness.

The principles of this Bible school have been thoroughly tested by the fires of cruel criticism and oppression, but they were founded upon God's sure word of the truth, and today they stand forth "as clear as the sun and as terrible as an army with banners."

We praise God, with Miss Moore, the great founder of the Fireside School, the most efficient agency God has given us, to develop the home life of our people, that the day has dawned when thoughtful Christians see the necessity of magnifying God's Word in its entirety, and are pleading with men everywhere to accept the Bible, God's blessed book of truth, for it verily is the power of God unto salvation to all who believe it.

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    CHAPTER X.
  --  Sanctification.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XII.
  --  Virginia's Work Extended.