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    CHAPTER XXVII
  --  A NEWFIELD   Table of Contents     II.

Rollin, Frank [Frances] A.
Life and Public Services of Martin R. Delany

- CHAPTER XXVII -- A NEWFIELD
- I.


I.

PROSPECTS OF THE FREEDMEN OF HILTON HEAD

Every true friend of the Union, residing on the island, must feel an interest in the above subject, regardless of any other consideration than that of national polity. Have the blacks become self-sustaining and will they ever, in a state of freedom, resupply the products which comprised the staples formerly of the on planters? These are question of importance, and not unworthy of consideration of grave political economists

That the blacks of the island have not been self-sustaining will not be pretended, neither can it be denied that they have been generally industrious and inclined to work. But industry alone is not sufficient, nor work available, expect these command adequate compensation

Have the blacks innately the elements of industry and enterprise? Compare them with any other people, and note their adaption. Do they not make good "day laborers"? Are they not good field hands? they not make good domestics? Are they not good house servants? Do they not readily "turn their hands" to anything or kind of work they may find to do?

raster
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Trained, they make good body servants, house servants, or laundresses, waiters, chambers and dining-room servants, cooks, nurses, drivers, horse "tenders," and, indeed, fill as well, and better, many of the domestic occupations than any other race. And with unrestricted facilities for learning, will it be denied that they are as susceptible of the mechanical occupations or trades as they are of the domestic? Will it be denied that a people easily domesticated are susceptible of the higher attainments? The slaveholder, long since, cautioned against "giving a nigger an inch, lest he should take an ell."

If permitted, I will continue this subject in a series of equally short articles, so as not to intrude on your columns.


    CHAPTER XXVII
  --  A NEWFIELD   Table of Contents     II.