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    DILIGENCE AND NEGLIGENCE.   Table of Contents     DECISION OF CHARACTER.

Plato, Ann
Essays

- TWO SCHOOL GIRLS.

TWO SCHOOL GIRLS.


I heard two girls as they conversed. "Good morning," said one, "where are you walking, and don't you calculate to attend school any more?" The answer was, "I am going to visit our Natural History Room; and do not think of attending school at present."

With these two girls I was well acquainted. Afterwards, as I reflected, I could not help saying to myself, "I think by her appearance in school, that she does not gain as much useful knowledge, as the one who was about to visit the Natural History Room."

In school, she does not pay that attention to

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studies as does her friend. She hastily runs over them, and pursues the lessons that require the least labor. Gives a short recitation of poetry and dialogue. She undertakes mathematics, and thinks them too dull for her--at length they are dropped. Her writing is ill performed. Her rapid and confused elocution, if not attended too, will be found adhesive through life. On this account her teacher is often obliged to speak to her, while at recitation.

Her friend is an industrious and careful girl while in school. She seeks knowledge from the most difficult and useful studies, as well as those which are less so. She collects her mind and thoughts upon the lesson which may be marked for her.

Although not in school as much as the other, still she has gained more useful knowledge, and is more prepared to encounter the world's troubles. She who is not willing to contend with difficulties, is not fitted for this world. "The being who best knows for what end we were placed here, has scattered in our path something beside roses."

Although she was not altogether distinguished for fine talents, yet she was a thorough scholar. Her answers were with entire correctness and precision. When not in school, she employed herself in that which would give her the most useful and solid instruction. She visited scenes which would help to deepen that knowledge.

She felt strongly, that strength of intellect is acquired by conquering hard studies, and strength of character by overcoming obstacles. She knew that knowledge painfully gained was not easily lost.

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Look at them, after their course of scholastic training! One, with her family, considering it her ambition to make a showy appearance. No rational economy--no patience to study, nor selfcontrol to practice. By her wasteful expenditure of dress, and servants, their affairs became seriously embarrassed; and she too helpless to do anything in their distress.

The fortune of the husband of her friend was not large; but by constant economy, she was able to secure every comfort, and to remember the poor. Her family was well regulated, and taught order, industry, and perseverence which she herself had learned. In observing these families, it was clear whose was the seat of the greatest order, comfort and happiness.

"Time was, when the temple of science was barred against the foot of woman. Heathen tyranny held her in vassalage, and Mahometan prejudice pronounced her without a soul. Now, from the sanctuary which knowledge and wisdom have conscerated, and from whence she was so long excluded, the interdict is taken away. How does she prize the gift? Does she press to gain a stand at the temple of knowledge, or will she clothe her brow in vanity, and be satisfied with ignorance. May we improve the influence which is now given us, and seek for "glory and immortality beyond the grave."

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    DILIGENCE AND NEGLIGENCE.   Table of Contents     DECISION OF CHARACTER.