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    CHAPTER VI.
  --  THE FAMILY SOLD AT AUCTION--LOUISA BOUGHT BY A NEW
  --  ORLEANS GENTLEMAN, AND WHAT CAME OF IT.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER VIII.
  --  OCTOROON LIFE IN NEW ORLEANS.

Mattison, Hiram
Louisa Picquet, the Octoroon

- CHAPTER VII. -- INSIDE VIEWS OF ANOTHER SOUTHERN FAMILY.

CHAPTER VII.
INSIDE VIEWS OF ANOTHER SOUTHERN FAMILY.


Q. --" Did you feel that you were doing right in living, as you did, with Mr. Williams?"

A. --"No; when I was a little girl in Georgia the madame, Mrs. Cook, used to read the Bible, and explain it to us. One night she read the commandments about stealin', and committin' adultery. They made a great impression on my mind. I knew what stealin' was, but I did not know what adultery was. Then I asked her the meanin'. She did not want to answer for a good while. I suppose I was so small she hated to tell me, but I kept on askin'. Then she said, 'You see Lucy, how many children she's got?' I told her yes. Then she said she did not know the father of any of them children, and said when folks had children that way they must be married like she (Mrs. Cook) was to her husband. It was adultery to stay with any one without bein' married--that was the meanin' of it."

Q. --"Who was this Lucy?'

A. --"She was a seamstress in Mrs. Cook's family."

Q. --"What was her color?"

A. --"Right white--light hair and blue eyes. All her children were right white."

Q. --"And was she a slave?"

A. --"Yes, sir."

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Q. --"How many children had she?"

A. --"Five or six in Georgia, and one after she went to Mobile."

Q. --"And had she no husband?"

A. --"No, sir; never had a husband in her life."

Q. --"Do not the slave women usually have husbands, or those they call their husbands?"

A. --"Yes, sir; some of them do; but some of them do not. They can't have any husbands, because their masters have them all the time."

Q. --"How did you say it was with Lucy?"

A. --"She sew in the house all day, and then go to her room, off, at night."

Q. --"What became of her?"

A. --"Well, she was sold the day I was, in Mobile, and got free after a while; and each of the white men bought his child. Mr. Moore bought his, and Mr. Hale bought his; and then the others, that their fathers would not own, her relations bought and set free."

Q. --"Who do you mean by her relations?"

A. --"Why Lucy's sister Judy, and Mr.-- *

(*) We have the name, but Mrs. P. dare not have it published, as the parties are still living, and she fears they might shoot her. , who kept her. I tell you how he did: He bought Elcy, Lucy's sister, first, and lived with her till she died. He had her learn to read and write, and taught her music, and done first rate by her. Then, when Elcy died, he bought her sister, Judy, and is livin' with her yet. Then, when they heard that Lucy was sold, all her sisters and brothers unite, sent on and bought her, and set her free."

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    CHAPTER VI.
  --  THE FAMILY SOLD AT AUCTION--LOUISA BOUGHT BY A NEW
  --  ORLEANS GENTLEMAN, AND WHAT CAME OF IT.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER VIII.
  --  OCTOROON LIFE IN NEW ORLEANS.