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    CHAPTER III.
  --  THE SECOND MASTER FAILS, AND HIS SLAVES ARE SCATTERED.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER V.
  --  INTRIGUES OF A MARRIED SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN.

Mattison, Hiram
Louisa Picquet, the Octoroon

- CHAPTER IV -- A WHITE SLAVE LOVE ADVENTURE.

CHAPTER IV
A WHITE SLAVE LOVE ADVENTURE.


" While I was living in Mobile, a gentleman there owned a colored man that was more white than I am. He was about my age. He had no beard; just a young man, might have been nineteen or twenty. His master was not married, but had a girl belong to him, a very light girl he bought from Charleston; he bought her for himself, though he kept her boarding out.

"This colored man I spoke of used to drive out when his master's sisters wanted to go out. They often came to Mr. English's with them, and ring the bell. There I met him often at the door before I knew he was colored, and when he found out I was colored, he was always very polite, and say, 'Good morning, miss,' and ask if the ladies was in. Then, after he got acquainted, he used to come and see me Sundays. He wanted me to marry him, and I liked him very well, and would have had him if he had not run off."

Q. --"How came he to run off?"

A. --"You see Mr.-- *

(*) Mrs. P. dare not have any of these names published, as all the parties are still living. kept that girl, but never go where she was; but, whenever he want to see her he send for her to

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the office. And this young man who wanted me had to go always and tell that girl, and go with her to the office, whenever his master wanted him to.

"Then this man had another waitman, one was perfectly white, and the other jet black; and the black one got jealous of the other one, and thought his master thought more of his other servant, the white one. (He did think more of him.) So the two had a falling out; and, to seek revenge, the dark one told the master he see something which he did not see--that the other one was out walking with this girl. He knew [that is, the black one] that his master would whip him [the light one] for that, when he would not whip him for any thing else. That night his master had not sent for her, and, of course, he thought it might be true.

"Then he ask T--about it, and he denied it, but the owner believed it. Then he whipped him awfully, soon as he came to the office that morning; and sent for the girl, and whipped her, and sent her off to New Orleans.

"Then the partner of this man, he spoke to T--afterward, and told him he would go away. He was an Englishman, or Scotchman. He came out that way--was not raised there. He never would own a slave. He felt sorry that T--was whipped so, and told him he would go away. His first excuse was he had no money, and the next was on account of being acquainted with me. Then the man inquire what kind of looking girl I was, and told him if I was white as he represented there would be no difficulty at all about getting away, and he would let him have money for both of us to go away.

"Then he told me what this gentleman said to him, and that he had the money from this gentleman, and wanted me to go away with him. Well, I knew that he could neither read nor write, and was afraid that we would be caught, and so I dare not go. We had about two hours' talk then, but when he found out I would not go, he said he must go; he had the money, and all his arrangements made. That's the last I saw of him. I suppose T--left that night. 'Twas not very long after that I went to Mr. Bachelor's to live, and we were all sold."

We shall hear of this fugitive T--again, further on in our narrative.

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    CHAPTER III.
  --  THE SECOND MASTER FAILS, AND HIS SLAVES ARE SCATTERED.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER V.
  --  INTRIGUES OF A MARRIED SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN.