[Home] [Book] [Expand] [Collapse] [Help]

Clear Search Expand Search


    PREFACE.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER II.
  --  BEREAVEMENT--CHANGE OF MASTER AND HOME--UNJUST
  --  DEMANDS--PUNISHMENT ESCAPED.

Veney, Bethany
The Narrative of Bethany Veney, slave woman

- Aunt Betty's Story . -- CHAPTER I. -- CHILDHOOD--FIRST LESSONS IN MORALITY--FIRST LESSON -- IN THE ART OF ENTERTAINING.

Aunt Betty's Story .
CHAPTER I.
CHILDHOOD--FIRST LESSONS IN MORALITY--FIRST LESSON
IN THE ART OF ENTERTAINING.


I Have but little recollection of my very early life. My mother and her five children were owned by one James Fletcher, Pass Run, town of Luray, Page County, Virginia. Of my father I know nothing.

The first thing I remember with any distinctness was when, about seven years old, I was, with other children, knocking apples from a tree, when we were surprised by my young mistress, Miss Nasenath Fletcher, calling to us, in a loud and threatening tone, demanding what we were doing. Without waiting for reply, she told us to follow her; and, as she led the way down to a blackberry pasture not far off, she endeavored, in a very solemn manner, to impress us with the importance of always telling the truth. "If asked a question," she said, "we must answer directly, yes or no." I asked her "what we must say if asked something which we did not know." She answered, "Why, you must say you don't know, of course." I said, "I shall say, 'Maybe 'tis, and maybe 'tain't.'" I remember well how the children laughed at this; and then Miss Nasenath went on to tell us that some time all this world that we saw would be burned up,

raster
8
--that the moon would be turned into blood, the stars would fall out of the sky, and everything would melt away with a great heat, and that everybody, every little child that had told a lie, would be cast into a lake of fire and brimstone, and would burn there for ever and ever, and, what was more, though they should burn for ever and ever, they would never be burned up.

I was dreadfully frightened; and, as soon as I could get away, I ran to my mammy, and, repeating what mistress had said, begged to know if it could be true. To my great sorrow, she confirmed it all, but added what Miss Nasenath had failed to do; namely, that those who told the truth and were good would always have everything they should want. It seemed to me then there was nothing so good as molasses and sugar; and I eagerly asked, "Shall I have all the molasses and sugar I want, if I tell the truth?" "Yes," she replied, " if you are good ; but remember, if you tell lies, you will be burned in the lake that burns for ever and ever."

This made a very strong impression upon me. I can never forget my mammy's manner at the time. I believed every word she said, and from that day to this I have never doubted its truth.

Though my conception of what constituted the truth was very dim, my fear of what should befall me, if I were to tell a lie, was very great. Still, I was only a young child, and could not, long at a time, be very unhappy.

My old master, who at times was inclined to be jolly, had a way of entertaining his friends by my singing and dancing. Supper over, he would call me into his room, and, giving me to understand what he wanted of me, I would, with all manner of grotesque grimaces, gestures, and positions, dance and sing:--

raster
9


"Where are you going, Jim?
Where are you going, Sam?
To get a proper larning,
To jump Jim Crow."

or


"David the king was grievit and worrit,
He went to his chamber--
His chamber and weppit;
And, as he went, he weppit and said,

'O my son, O my son!
Would to God I had died
For thee, O Absalom,
My son, my son,'"--

and many other similar songs, of the meaning of which I had of course no idea, and I have since thought neither he nor his friends could have had any more than I.

raster
10

    PREFACE.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER II.
  --  BEREAVEMENT--CHANGE OF MASTER AND HOME--UNJUST
  --  DEMANDS--PUNISHMENT ESCAPED.