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    THE GRAVE OF THE SLAVE.   Table of Contents     THE DEATH OF MOSES.--CHAPTER IX.

Mossell, N.F.
The Work of Afro-American Women

- THE AFRO-AMERICAN WOMAN IN VERSE.
- ON THE ABANDONMENT OF PREJUDICE.


ON THE ABANDONMENT OF PREJUDICE.


We are thy sisters; God has truly said
That of one blood the nations he has made.
O Christian woman, in a Christian land,
Canst thou unblushing read this great command?

Suffer the wrongs which wring our inmost heart
To draw one throb of pity on thy part!
Our skins may differ, but from thee we claim
A sister's privilege and a sister's name.

The "Grave of the Slave" became quite popular, and was set to music by Frank Johnson, the great negro musician of Philadelphia.

The next woman we shall delight to honor is Mrs. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper. Mrs. Harper has

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been an Anti-Slavery lecturer in the days now past, and wrote several poems of great worth in that movement. Since the emancipation of the slaves she has been a lecturer in the temperance cause, and is now Superintendent in the National Woman's Temperance Union, and is also a director in the Woman's Congress, of which she has been one of the ablest members.

Both as a writer of prose and poetry Mrs. Harper's talents are too well known to need eulogy at our hands. She is still among us, laboring with her pen, as her poem, entitled "The Dying Bondsman," and her contribution to the symposium on the Democratic return to power, both published in the A.M.E. Church Review , attest. She likewise contributed to the "Alumni Magazine" and many of the first-class weeklies published by our race.

We give a brief quotation from her beautiful poem, entitled "Moses. A story of the Nile."


    THE GRAVE OF THE SLAVE.   Table of Contents     THE DEATH OF MOSES.--CHAPTER IX.