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    SELF-EDUCATION OF THE NEGRO.   Table of Contents     THE QUESTION OF COLOR SHOULD BE BARRED.

Mossell, N.F.
The Work of Afro-American Women

- CASTE IN INSTITUTIONS DEVOTED TO THE EDUCATION -- OF THE COLORED RACE.
- CASTE IN THE COLORED COLLEGES.


CASTE IN THE COLORED COLLEGES.

It is difficult to see how the trustees of at least two of the colored colleges can escape "both horns" of the dilemma presented to them by Dr. N. F. Mossell at a meeting Wednesday evening of the alumni of Lincoln University. The university has been some thirty years in existence, and counts some 400 graduates; but none of these is represented in the faculty, and, as Dr. Mossell sell says, this circumstance indicates one of two things, "either that the education of the university is a failure, or that the caste prejudice forces the alumni out of these positions." Their exclusion is, at all events, anomalous. In other educational institutions it is the common practice to appoint graduates to faculty positions, whenever this may be done without detriment to the interests concerned, and there is no reason why the question should not obtain in a college for colored men as well as in one for white men.

Such, however, is the fact, and the alumni of colored colleges naturally feel very sore about it. As alumni, and particularly alumni belonging to a race which, but a generation ago, it was in some portions of this country a crime to instruct in the simplest rudiments of

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education, they are supposed to take an especial pride and an honorable interest in their colleges. They share, indeed, the interest which of late years has been especially evinced by alumni of all the colleges of the country.

The graduates of Howard, Biddle, *

(*) Biddle has at this date an entire Colored faculty, who are doing good work, and Lincoln Universities have made urgent and repeated requests for representation in the faculties of those institutions. In the first named they have been measurably successful, we believe, but in neither of the others has their request met with the consideration they bespeak for it and they are convinced that the reason is that assigned by Dr. Mossell.

And if this is possible it ought to be done. For nothing can be less in accord with the principles on which the colored colleges were founded, than the fostering in the faintest degree, or the most impalpable form, of the spirit of caste, which these alumni charge upon their trustees, and which bears upon them far more cruelly than does ignorance, since it militates against their consideration as men.

"It gives me pleasure," said Rev. J. Wheaton Smith, the noted Baptist divine, "to say that complexion, whether light or dark, is not the test of manhood, and

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should constitute no hindrance to either a pupil or teacher. In an institution of learning for the education of the colored race, other things being equal. I should give the preference to the darker hue. It is demanded by a ripening future, and the past crowded with un-numbered wrongs.
    SELF-EDUCATION OF THE NEGRO.   Table of Contents     THE QUESTION OF COLOR SHOULD BE BARRED.