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    CHAPTER XI.
  --  Virginia's Experience in Miss Moore's Fireside School.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XIII.
  --  Places of Special Interest Visited.

Broughton, V.W.
Twenty Year's Experience of a Missionary

- CHAPTER XII. -- Virginia's Work Extended.

CHAPTER XII.
Virginia's Work Extended.


From the fireside school work Virginia was called to state mission work. A new field of operations was at once entered upon, and other good men and women were reached who gladly embraced the opportunity to engage in our organized mission work. In the East Fork District Sister Crocker was found possessed of great zeal to work and has striven hard to do what she could, but had been greatly hindered. Virginia was enabled to help her specially and all the Christian women of that district generally by instructing them as to the Bible idea of woman's work. Thus the way was opened in the East Fork District for those women who were impelled by the Holy Spirit to do our Lord's blessed work. Sisters Crocker and Bell, who had been spiritually awakened, praised God that he opened the way for them to exercise their Spiritual gifts ere they died. A great work was begun in Clarksville through

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Virginia and her associate worker, M. H. Flowers. This work has grown to such proportions that a stationed missionary has been located there through the kindness of the W. B. H. M. Society. Mrs. M. H. Flowers was permitted by this society to foster that work for a short while, then Miss R. J. Carter, of New York, was sent there. She has enlarged and strengthened the mission work in that city and vicinity until its helpfulness is acknowledged by the surrounding country. The following lines of work are successfully engaged in at our mission station in Clarksville: A woman's Bible class is taught; a missionary society does effective local district and state work; an art class and nurse training class are taught for special benefit of our young women; domestic science is taught to all the women; domestic science is taught to all the women; children's kindergarten, industrial school, temperance band and mission Sunday school are all operated under the management of our most efficient missionary, Miss R. J. Carter. This mission also sustains three workers who travel far and near, building up and enlarging the work of this mission. Steps are being taken to purchase ground and establish the mission on a permanent location. We ask our readers' prayers for the continued success of this noble endeavor. As Virginia traveled on toward the East several towns were visited, missionary societies organized, and our women encouraged to join our great organized for evangelizing the world.
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Sister D. Furgerson of M. has developed into an efficient helper. Another sister of that town has shown much courage and perseverance. We hope success may crown her efforts.

Further on Virginia found a faithful little woman in Wartrace just waiting for some encouragement to go forward in her Lord's work, even as Simeon waited to see the Lord Jesus. A great meeting was held at that point, the good pastor joining heartily with our missionary in conducting a series of meetings that proved a blessing to the church. Quite a number of children were happily converted. The missionary society was organized, and it began at once to improve the dilapidated condition of everything about the church. This new life soon spread throughout the church, and the church edifice was soon changed, the improvements being so great one would scarcely recognize it as the same house only for its location. At S., another wide-awake Sister Bell was found. She took hold of our woman's work earnestly from the very first. As we expected, she has developed into a strong worker and is now traveling throughout the Elk River District strengthening and enlarging our mission work. Virginia continued her journey eastward encouraging and enlisting volunteers into the Master's service. T. is the next town she visited. Though a small town a more active and faithful band

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of Christian women would be hard to find than those who enlisted in our work in T. God blessed that society with a good president, Mrs. J. Simmons, to be gin with, which means so much to any new organization. The work grew steadily upward under her management. The work grew steadily upward under her management. The women have developed beautifully; they have done good work in their own town relieving the sick and needy; they have contributed to our woman's work in the district, state and national organizations, and sent representatives to all these general conventions. Too much cannot be said in praise of this useful, influential society of Christian women. They were ever careful regarding the entertainment of their missionary, at one time even giving her a special reception as a mark of their high appreciation of her services in their behalf.

Virginia made her next stop at D. While this place has been slow in taking hold of our work it has finally fallen in line and we all rejoice to see the fruit that now appears after years of toil and care in that Mrs. Wm. S. has become so interested in missions as to be made president of the district and then attended our National Convention as its representative. Truly "He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him." Ps. 126: 6. We found a strong young woman in W. God has used her for several

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years to hold our work intact in that town and do some excellent work. This society has ever expressed its gratitude to our missionary in such tangible form that she could not doubt for a moment that they hold her in loving remembrance. The district missionary, Mrs. J.S., accompanied Virginia as far as C., another small town, where she held several meetings, organized the women and left them rejoicing that God had given women something they could do to advance his kingdom.

S. P. is a little rugged mountainous town, beautiful for situation, with the lofty picturesque mountains on the north and the peaceful flowing river on the south. Here Virginia stopped again. She had an overflow meeting at this place. A most graceful introduction was made by a friend who had known her for years, and thus every preliminary for a helpful interesting meeting was provided. The Lord blessed Virginia's effort and a strong missionary society was organized; the work has grown steadily all these years, and is now one of the strongest societies of the Elk River District. Further on the historic city of C. was reached. Here our missionary work and the good women of C. were well prepared for the splendid work they are now doing under the efficient management of the stationed missionaries, whom the W. B. H. M. society has located there. Our missionary has only felt it

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necessary for her to stop occasionally here, say a word of cheer, and get new inspiration from the reports these dear women are ever ready to render. The W.C.T.U. work of that town demands a part of Virginia's service, and she is always welcome, and will stop as she journeys through the state if only a few hours to meet the sisters associated in this great reformatory work.

Another little town farther east has accepted our work, but little progress has been made from lack of some capable woman to lead. London is a town that must be mentioned because of one faithful woman there who, like the Shunamite woman of old, had a room of her house set apart for God's traveling servants, where they could go at any time and be heartily welcomed. Frequent changes of pastors have kept the church of L. so unsettled that our work has been greatly retarded. The next stop was made in the great city of K. Our churches there accepted the woman's work from its incipiency. Strong workers have been developed. Great results of work done are annually reported by the representatives of our two largest and most progressive churches of that city. These two societies minister largely to the up building of their own churches, to our school in East Tennessee, and to the general organized mission work throughout the district, state and nation. Virginia has so many homes in K. she can rarely ever stay there

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long enough to satisfy the wishes of those who wish to entertain her. Dear Sister Hamilton, who is a tower of strength for our work throughout the state and nation, is specially noted for her hospitality. The people of God are ever welcome at her home; also at Sister Dobson's. These sisters' kind husbands join heartily with them in caring for God's servants in their lovely houses. The W.C.T.U. of this town is also a power for good and never fails to come at the call of the president to hear any message Virginia may have for them on her annual visits as the president of Tennessee W.C.T.U. No.2. From the delights and encouragement enjoyed in K., where our work is flourishing, the missionary journeys on to the less favored regions beyond. She only stopped where invitations or instructions warranted a stop. The school at Johnson City is of special interest, accordingly a missionary society and children's band were organized there. The school has already been greatly blessed through these auxiliary bodies. Three mining towns were visited in this section. The missionary found the people attentive and appreciative while she delivered her message to them. They readily accepted our work and gave us substantial encouragement by contributing liberally to our missionary's expenses and taking her literature. At Raven C. the miners entered heartily into the services and sang such sweet
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songs that our missionary would gladly have tarried long with them. In this trip Virginia learned much of the miners' lives and realized more fully the dangers to which the miners are exposed that we might have the fuel and light necessary to our bodily comfort. God has abundantly provided coal and given man the needed skill to secure it. Let us praise God for this bountiful provision, and pray for the protection of those who go down into the deep mines to secure it. Truly God is good and his love is beyond our understanding. "He that spared not his only begotten Son, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things?."

From J. C., in company with Rev. H., the superintendent of state missions, and others, Virginia went to a district association at Flat Woods. A long, tedious journey of many hours' ride through the country, brought us to the place of meeting at eventide. Virginia was a stranger in this section and all were anxious to see her and hear her speech, since she had been so highly recommended to this association by the superintendent of missions. Accordingly an opportunity was soon given her to speak. She was introduced by Rev. H., whose knowledge of her work enabled him to speak so full and free that every obstacle was removed and greater freedom of speech was never given our missionary before. The Lord used her most

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effectively while she gave the Bible authority for women's mission work. The vast congregation was held spellbound throughout her discourse. The pastor of that church was one of the leaders of that district. Until that time the confessed that he had been a doubting Thomas with many others of his brethren as to woman's ability to deliver a Bible message, but he was then thoroughly convinced and has proven to be a faithful supporter of our cause throughout that section of country ever since. Virginia made many staunch friends for our cause and her labors did much to cement the work of union and cooperation between the associations of East and West that had been effected by Superintendent H. Rev. Breedlove, a young man dearly beloved by his brethren for his Christian seal and piety, pastored more than a hundred miles further in the mountains, and he became so interested in the woman's work as presented by Virginia that he urged her to come to his church as early as possible. Consequently a tour of that whole section was planned for the month of December to be made in company with the superintendent of missions who had visited that section before and knew its dearth and hardships. As the superintendent expected our deprivations began as soon as we left M. One day we had only a few cents above our railroad fare and that was used to purchase a little fruit, the superintendent saying, "We
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need some refreshment and what we have will not carry us to another point." That often occurs in the missionary's life. Virginia remembers even going to the depot without having enough money to buy her ticket, but the Lord ever provided, "For man's extremity is God's opportunity." Superintendent H. and Virginia arrived in Johnson City late in the evening, and found no one awaiting them, and beside, the church was in a most confused condition, wrangling over the call or discharge of the pastor. After considerable stir and parleying a lodging place was given the missionaries for that night. Virginia attended the services next day and according to her custom took an active part, beginning in the Sunday school at 9 a.m. The unfavorable condition of affairs made this first visit somewhat discouraging, but the missionary society was organized and from subsequent visits and reports that work has grown and developed into one of the strongest societies in the state of Tennessee. God has some female servant's in Johnson City, who are truly awakened to their duties as Christians. Their interest and development have been frequently manifest in the substantial support of all the objects of organization. Our missionaries journeyed on to Elizabethton, where Moderator Breedlove resided. He gave them a warm, hearty welcome and although his church edifice had been swept away by a terrific flood,
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our missionaries held a blessed service in the school house, which was packed to its uttermost capacity. God blessed the service with showers of blessings. All rejoiced, sang and praised God, in testimonies, praise, prayer and contributions to the cause. One aged man who lived several miles in the country remained over night and called early next morning to have our missionary pray for him. She was glad God had awakened the dear man, and she prayed and reasoned with him from God's World as best she could, and then left him with the fond hope that a man who had such faith as was evidence by that aged brother would be duly rewarded. From this point our missionaries began their return trip. They stopped again at Johnson City where they had been so badly disappointed. The friends made every apology for the coolness of Saturday night's reception, and perfect satisfaction was given. The next stop was made at White Pine, where Rev. Thomas has charge of a flourishing congregation. Rev. T. had failed to make the appointment and only a few persons came out the first night of the meeting, hence the pastor prevailed on the superintendent to tarry a night longer, as our missionaries were so impoverished a good meeting was absolutely necessary unless the pastor could provide some other way for their expenses.
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Superintendent H. and the neighbors' children gathered cedar and holly bushes the day they tarried in White Pine, and our missionaries made beautiful Christmas wreaths, desiring to carry something to gladden the dear ones at home. Conditions in that section were such that our missionaries counted it a special Providence to get railroad fare to their homes. Superintendent H. made a touching plea for missions in this sermon, and Virginia sang a suggestive hymn and then emphasized the points that were calculated to stir the audience to do their full duty as far as they were able on that special occasion. Pastor Thompson was especially helpful; other help came to the missionaries in their homeward journey. One brother even came to the railroad station and brought a contribution he had collected from the Morristown church. These valiant herald of the cross reached their homes in due season, rejoicing that God counted them worthy to suffer some for his dear Name's sake.

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    CHAPTER XI.
  --  Virginia's Experience in Miss Moore's Fireside School.   Table of Contents     CHAPTER XIII.
  --  Places of Special Interest Visited.