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The Mapleson Cylinders - Program Notes

- Libretti
- Verdi: AIDA [Includes RealAudio Selections]
- Band 9

Band 9

Act II, Scene 2: Ma tu, o Re excerpt : "[doman voi po]tria il fato colpir" ... "O Re possente, Re"

Johanna Gadski (s), Aida

Louise Homer (a), Amneris

Emilio De Marchi (t), Radamès

Giuseppe Campanari (b), Amonasro

Marcel Journet (bs), Ramfis

Adolph Mühlmann (b), King

Metropolitan Opera Chorus & Orchestra--

Luigi Mancinelli

January 31, 1903

[Possibly Glackens 16 undated: "Quite good bass, soprano & tenor all heard at times between & with chorus"; snake with a hard-to-decipher date that could be "1/23" or "21?/03" (there was an Aida performance on January 21, 1903, with Gadski, Kirkby-Lunn, De Marchi, Campanari, Edouard De Reszke as Ramfis, and Journet as the King, conducted by Mancinelli). Since the playback speed matches others from the January 31 performance, we have preferred that attribution.]

Among the prisoners Radamès has brought back from Ethiopia, Aida recognizes her father the king, disguised as an ordinary soldier. Amonasro pleads for clemency, and is joined by all except the vengeful Ramfis and his fellow-priests. Mapleson's recording begins in midstream, just before the initial prayer is repeated by the ensemble.

[original]

AIDA

Doman voi po]tria il fato colpir. Ah!

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
Si compisca de' Numi, de' Numi il voler! (The others are also finishing various phrases at this point, and a cadenza from Aida leads back to the prayer:)

AIDA and AMONASRO
Ma tu, o Re, tu signore possente,
a costoro ti mostra clemente;
oggi noi siam percossi dal fato,
doman voi potria il fato colpir. (Under these words, Amneris rages over Radamès' clear love for Aida, Radamès observes that grief makes Aida still lovelier, Ramfis and the priests oppose the plea for mercy, and the prisoners and populace beseech compassion.)

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
Struggi, o Re,

AIDA (while the other principals express various sentiments)
doman voi...

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
struggi, o Re,

AIDA
doman voi...

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
queste ciurme, Simultaneous singing begins

AIDA
il fato potria doman voi,
potria colpir,
doman voi potria il fato,
doman voi potria colpir,

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
fur dai Numi votati all morte,
si compisca dei numi il voler!
fur dai Numi, dai Numi votati all morte,
fur votati all morte! (All pause; then:) Simultaneous singing endsSimultaneous singing begins

AMONASRO, then AIDA
doman voi potria colpir.

RADAMÈS
Nel mio petto ravviva l'ardor, l'ardor. Simultaneous singing ends (The others also echo their previous sentiments.)

[translation]

AIDA

Tomorrow, fate might well strike you.

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
Let the will of the Gods, of the Gods be done! (The others are also finishing various phrases at this point, and a cadenza from Aida leads back to the prayer:)

AIDA and AMONASRO
But you, o King, mighty lord.
look on these prisoners with clemency;
today we are struck down by fate,
but tomorrow fate might well strike you. (Under these words, Amneris rages over Radamès' clear love for Aida, Radamès observes that grief makes Aida still lovelier, Ramfis and the priests oppose the plea for mercy, and the prisoners and populace beseech compassion.)

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
Destroy, o King,

AIDA (while the other principals express various sentiments)
tomorrow you...

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
destroy, o King,

AIDA
tomorrow you...

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
these ferocious slaves, Simultaneous singing begins

AIDA
but tomorrow fate might well strike you,
might well strike you,
tomorrow fate might strike you,
tomorrow might well strike you,

RAMFIS and PRIESTS
They were condemned to die by the gods,
let the will of the gods be done!
They were condemned to die by the gods, by the gods,
they were condemned to die! (All pause; then:) Simultaneous singing endsSimultaneous singing begins

AMONASRO, then AIDA
tomorrow might well strike you.

RADAMÈS
In my breast [each tear] strengthens my ardor, my ardor. Simultaneous singing ends (The others also echo their previous sentiments.)


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