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     Mascagni: CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA    Table of Contents      Mancinelli: ERO E LEANDRO

The Mapleson Cylinders - Program Notes

- Libretti
- Leoncavallo: PAGLIACCI [Includes RealAudio Selections]


Leoncavallo: PAGLIACCI [ Click for RealAudio Selections ]

Pagliacci arrived at the Met shortly after Calvé, on December 11, 1893; Melba was Nedda, opposite the debuts of Fernando De Lucia as Canio and Mario Ancona as Tonio. Like Cav, it was introduced on a bill with Orfeo, but eleven days later it was united with Mascagni's opera (as rarely since, the sequence that night was Pag-Cav ). It was some years before the pairing became standard, in part because Pagliacci took longer to achieve popularity: only in Caruso's day would it become a sure-fire hit. By the turn of the century Pagliacci had reached a total of only nine performances, and it was performed only once in each of Mapleson's first two seasons of recording. Things picked up in 1902-03, which saw six performances, most of them with Albert Alvarez as Canio, Fritzi Scheff as Nedda, and Scotti as Tonio. Mapleson took recordings at two of these; Bands 4 and 5 come from a matinee when Pagliacci followed Donizetti's Fille, Bands 6 and 7 from the only time it preceded the same work (the same occasion as Mapleson's recordings from Fille, in fact--see Side 4/Bands 3-4).

Band 4

Act I: Scene 1 excerpt: "A ventitrè ore!"..."e a Tonio, [e un poco a tutti or parlo!]" parlo!]"

Albert Alvarez (t), Canio

Albert Reiss (t), Beppe

Antonio Scotti (b), Tonio

Unidentified (t, b), Two Villagers

Metropolitan Opera Chorus & Orchestra--

Phillippe Flon

February 7 (matinee), 1903

[Dated snake and slip; Glackens 107.]

A troupe of strolling players (the leader Canio, his wife Nedda, the misshapen Tonio, and the amiable Beppe) have just arrived in the village, and Canio is finishing his pitch for the evening's performance.

[original]

CHORUS

A ventitrè ore!

CANIO
A ventitrè ore!

CHORUS
A ventitrè ore! ( Tonio tries to help Nedda down from the cart: Canio boxes his ears, and helps her down himself. )

CANIO
Via di lì!

CHORUS
Ah! Ah! Ah! ( to Tonio )
Prendi questo, bel galante!

BOYS
Con salute!

TONIO
La pagherai! brigante!

A VILLAGER ( to Canio )
Di,' con noi vuoi bevere
un buon bicchiere sulla crocevia?
Di,' vuoi tu?

CANIO
Con piacere.

BEPPE
Aspettatemi. Anch'io ci sto!

CANIO
Di,' Tonio, vieni via?

TONIO ( from within )
Io netto il somarello. Precedetemi.

ANOTHER VILLAGER
Bada, Pagliaccio, ei sole vuol restare
per far la corte a Nedda!

CANIO
Vi pare?
Un tal gioco, credetemi,
è meglio non giocarlo con me, miei cari;
e a Tonio, [e un poco a tutti or parlo!]

[translation]

CHORUS

At seven tonight!

CANIO
At seven tonight!

CHORUS
At seven tonight! ( Tonio tries to help Nedda down from the cart: Canio boxes his ears, and helps her down himself. )

CANIO
Off with you!

CHORUS
Ha! Ha! Ha! ( to Tonio )
Take that, you fine gallant!

BOYS
Our compliments!

TONIO
You'll pay! Bandit!

A VILLAGER ( to Canio )
Say, would you like to drink
a glass with us at the crossroads?
Say, would you?

CANIO
With pleasure.

BEPPE
Wait for me. I'll be there too.

CANIO
Say, Tonio, will you come?

TONIO ( from within )
I'll groom the donkey. Go ahead.

ANOTHER VILLAGER
Careful, Pagliaccio--he wants to be alone
to pay court to Nedda!

CANIO
You think so?
A game like that, believe me,
you'd best not play with me, my friends;
I'm speaking to Tonio, and a bit to all of you!

Band 5

Act I: Bell Chorus excerpt: "[Don] Din Don" ... to near conclusion of chorus

Metropolitan Opera Chorus & Orchestra--

Phillippe Flon

February 7 (matinee), 1903

[Slip; Glackens 58.]

The vesper bells sound, and the villagers go off to church. (Shortly after the beginning, there was an untrackable groove on the cylinder.)

[original]

CHORUS

[Don] Din Don Din Don Din Don Din. ecc. ( repeated under the following stanzas: )
Din, Don, suona vespero,
ragazze e garzon,
a coppie al tempio
ci affrettiam.
Din, Don, diggià i culmini
il sol vuol baciar.
Le mamme ci adocchiano,
attenti, compar!
Din, Don, tutto irradiasi
di luce e d'amor!
Ma i vecchi sorvegliano
gli arditi amador!
Le mamme ci adocchiano,
attenti, compar!
Ah! Ah!
Le mamme ci adocchiano,
attenti, compar! ( As the sopranos sing these words, the men repeat earlier phrases. )
Din, Don, ecc.
Din, Don, già suona vespero,
Din, Don, già tutto irradiasi
di luce e d'amor!
E tutto irradiasi
di luce e d'amore!
Le mamme adocchiano
già gli amador!
Ah!

[translation]

CHORUS

Dong, ding, dong, ding, dong, ding, dong, ding, etc. ( repeated under the following stanzas: )
Ding, dong, vespers are sounding,
girls and boys,
in pairs to church
let us hurry.
Ding, dong, already the sun
wants to kiss the western summits.
Our mothers are watching us,
be careful, friends.
Ding, dong, everything is shining
with light and with love!
But the old folks keep an eye on
the bold lovers!
Our mothers are watching us,
be careful, friends!
Ah! Ah!
Our mothers are watching us,
be careful, friends! ( As the sopranos sing these words, the men repeat earlier phrases. )
Ding, dong, etc.
Ding, dong, already vespers are sounding,
Ding, dong, already everything is shining
with light and with love!
And everything is shining
with light and with love!
Our mothers are already watching
the lovers!
Ah!

raster Band 6   [Click to Listen]

Act II: Opening Scene excerpt: "Ohè! Ohè!"... "Ma non pigiatevi, fa caldo tan[to]"

Antonio Scotti (b), Tonio

Metropolitan Opera Chorus & Orchestra--

Phillippe Flon

January 30, 1903

[Snake; Glackens 46.]

At the beginning of Act II, the villagers gather for the evening's performance.

[original]

CHORUS
( from behind the scene )
Ohè! ( entering )
Presto! Presto affrettiamoci, compare!

TONIO
Avanti, avanti, avanti, avanti!

CHORUS
Che lo spettacolo de cominciar.

TONIO
Si dà principio!

CHORUS
Presto compari, ci affrettiam.
Dee lo spettacol cominciar.

TONIO
Si dà principio, avanti, avanti!

CHORUS
Veh, come, come corrono le bricconcelle!
Che correre mio Dio!
(Accomodatevi comari belle!)
per giunger tosto qua.

TONIO
Pigliate posto!

CHORUS
Cerchiamo posto!

TONIO
Pigliate posto!

CHORUS
Ben sul davanti.
Cerchiam di metterci ben sul davanti,
che lo spettacolo dee cominciare.

TONIO
Avanti!

CHORUS
Spicciatevi!

TONIO
Pigliate posto! su!

CHORUS
Via su spicciatevi, incominciate.
Perchè tardate mai? perchè tardate?
Siam tutti là! Siam tutti là!

TONIO
Avanti, avanti, avanti, avanti!

CHORUS ( variously )
Ma non pigiatevi, ma non pigiatevi,
fa caldo! fa caldo! Su! Su! Su! Su!
Su; Beppe, aiutaci!
Veh! s'accapigliano!
chiamano aiuto!
Su, su, v'e posto accanto!
Ma non pigiatevi, fa caldo tan[to!
Sedete, via, senza gridar.]

[translation]

CHORUS
( from behind the scene )
Hey there! ( entering )

TONIO
Move along, move along!

CHORUS
The show must be starting.

TONIO
We're about to start!

[Begin Page 45]

CHORUS
Hurry, let's hurry, neighbors!
The show must be starting.

TONIO
We're about to start! Move along!

CHORUS
See how the ladies run, the rascals!
Heavens, what a rush
(Be comfortable, pretty ladies!)
to get there early.

TONIO
Take your places!

CHORUS
We're looking for seats!

TONIO
Take you places!

CHORUS
Down front.
Let's try to sit down front.
for the show is starting.

TONIO
Move along!

CHORUS
Get going!

TONIO
Take your places!

CHORUS
Get going, let's begin.
Why the delay? Why the delay?
We're all here! We're all here!

TONIO
Move along, move along!

CHORUS ( variously )
Now don't push, now don't push,
it's hot! it's hot! Come on, come on!
Come on--Beppe, help us!
Look, they are fighting!
calling for help!
Come on, there's a seat right here!
Now don't push, it's very hot!
Sit down, there, without shouting.

Band 7

Act II: Chorus: "Di qua! di qua!" ... to entrance of Columbine

Metropolitan Opera Chorus & Orchestra--

Phillippe Flon

January 30, 1903

[Slip; Glackens 11.]

This choral passage follows shortly after the preceding. At the end, we hear the opening music of the play-within-the-play.

[original]

CHORUS

Di qua! di qua! Incominciate! Suvvia!
Perchè tardar? Spicciate, incominciate!
Perchè tardar? Suvvia questa commedia!
Facciam rumor, sì sì, facciam rumore!
Diggià, diggià, suonar ventitrè ore!
Facciam rumor! Facciam rumor!
Allo spettacolo ognun anela!
Ah! S'alza la tela!
Silenzio! Silenzio! Silenzio!
Olà! Olà! Olà!

[translation]

CHORUS

You there! Up there! Begin!
Why delay? Hurry up, begin!
Why delay! Let's have this comedy!
Let's make noise, let's make noise!
Already seven o'clock has rung!
Let's make noise, let's make noise!
Everyone's eager for the show!
Ah! The curtain's going up!
Silence! Silence! Silence!
Hola! Hola! Hola! ( The curtain of the theater is drawn aside. Columbine is seated near a table; from time to time she looks anxiously at the door, then she rises, goes to look out the window, and returns, walking about restlessly. )


     Mascagni: CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA    Table of Contents      Mancinelli: ERO E LEANDRO