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     Program Notes    Table of Contents      Meyerbeer: LES HUGUENOTS

The Mapleson Cylinders - Program Notes

- Libretti
- Gounod: FAUST [Includes RealAudio Selections]


Gounod: FAUST [ Click for RealAudio Selections ]

The work that opened the Metropolitan Opera House in 1883 remained for many years one of the most popular in the theater's repertory. During the seasons when Mapleson was recording, Faust received seven performances in 1900-01, five in 1901-02, and again seven in 1902-03 (it is important to view these figures in the context of seasons containing between sixty-five and ninety-one operatic performances, rather than against today's totals of some two hundred). Mapleson's recordings, from at least seven different performances, capture a considerable range of the many French-born, -trained, and/or -oriented singers who were stars of Maurice Grau's company -- and also some first-hand evidence of an age when encores were not frowned upon.

Band 1

Act II: Waltz excerpt : "[Valsons, valsons,] valsons encore! Valsons!" ...to end of act

Metropolitan Opera Chorus and Orchestra --

Luigi Mancinelli

January 9, 1903

[Glackens 34.]

At the Kermesse, after Marguerite has refused Faust's offer of escort, the chorus (singing in Italian) resumes the celebrated Waltz. (This performance eschews a cut in the coda common in Met Faust performances of the Fifties.)

[original]

CHORUS

[Valsiam, valsiam,] valsiam ancor!
Valsiam, valsiam, valsiam ognor!
Valsiam! Valsiam! Valsiam! Valsiam! Ah!
Come le brezza allor che lieve,
viena la sera a sussurar,
fa la polve sol levar,
fa la polve sol levar.
Che la ridda ci trascini,
ed i colli a noi vicini,
di canzoni echeggeran,
di canzoni echeggeran.
Sino a perder fiato, sino a morir,
un Dio li trascina è voluttà!
Sino a perder fiato, sino a morir,
un Dio li trascina è voluttà!
La terra pargiri e dispar lor,
Qual suon, quale gioia sguardi d'amor! ecc.

[translation]

CHORUS

Waltz, waltz, waltz again!
Waltz, waltz, waltz, everyone!
Waltz, waltz, waltz, waltz! Ah!
As the wind that sportively plays,
at first will light dust only raise.
yet at last becomes a gale.
yet at last becomes a gale.
So our dancing and our singing.
soft at first, then loudly ringing
will resound o'er hill and dale.
will resound o'er hill and dale.
How great is the pleasure, thus to whirl round,
'neath heavens no greater e'er can be found!
How great is the pleasure, thus to whirl round,
'neath heavens no greater e'er can be found!
The earth seems advancing to meet the blue sky,
in joy, love, and music, hours swiftly fly! etc.

Band 2

Act III: Jewel Song excerpt : "[Comment n'être pas] coquette" ... "le bracelet et le collier!"

Nellie Melba (s), Marguerite

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra -- Luigi Mancinelli

March 28, 1901

[Snake; Glackens 85.]

Melba's excerpt begins after Marguerite has discovered and opened the mysterious casket of jewels, as she launches into the "Jewel Song". Shortly after the beginning of the middle section of the aria, the recording is interrupted by a Mapleson family recording (Side 12/Band 12: "I want to build my own house with my own blocks!").

[original]

MARGUERITE

[Comment n'être pas] coquette?
Ah! je ris de me voir
si belle en ce miroir!
Ah! je ris de me voir
si belle en ce miroir!
Est-ce toi, Marguerite,
est-ce toi?
Réponds-moi, réponds-moi,
réponds, réponds, réponds vite!
Non! non! -- ce n'est plus toi!
Non, non,
ce n'est plus ton visage!
C'est la fille d'un roi,
c'est la fille d'un roi!
Ce n'est plus toi,
ce n'est plus toi!
C'est la fille d'un roi,
qu'on salue au passage!
Ah! s'il était ici!
S'il me voyait ainsi!
Comme une demoiselle
il me trouverait belle!
Ah! comme une demoiselle
il me trouverait belle!
Comme une demoiselle
il me trouverait belle!
Achevons la métamorphose!
Il me tarde encore d'essayer
le bracelet et le collier.

[translation]

MARGUERITE

But am I not becoming vain?
Ah! I laugh, as I pass,
to look into a glass!
Ah! I laugh, as I pass,
to look into a glass!
Is it truly Marguerite, then?
Is it you?
Tell me true, tell me true,
tell me, tell me, tell me true!
No, no, 'tis not you!
No, no,
that bright face there reflected
must belong to a queen,
must belong to a queen!
'Tis not you,
'tis not you!
It must belong to a queen,
whom I greet as I pass her!
Ah! could he see me now,
here decked like this, I vow,
he surely would mistake me,
and for a noble lady take me!
Ah! he surely would mistake me,
and for a noble lady take me!
He surely would mistake me,
and for a noble lady take me!
I'll try on the rest,
the necklace and the bracelets
I fain would try.

Band 3

Act III: Jewel Song excerpt : "Est-ce toi, Marguerite?" ... to end of aria; and encore fragment: "Est-ce toi, Marguerite?" ... "Il me [trouverait belle!]"

Emma Calvé (s), Marguerite

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra -- Armando

Seppilli

February 15, 1902

[Slip; Glackens 30.]

Calvé's recording starts during the reprise of the aria's opening section and continues to the end. She then sings an encore, which Mapleson picks up at the same point in the aria where he began the cylinder. He runs out of recording time before Calvé reaches the end of the encore.

[original]

MARGUERITE

Est-ce toi, Marguerite?
est-ce toi?
Réponds-moi, réponds-moi,
réponds, réponds, réponds vite!
Ah! s'il était ici!
S'il me voyait ainsi!
Comme une demoiselle
il me trouverait belle!
Ah! comme une demoiselle
il me trouverait belle!
Comme une demoiselle
il me [ ← encore ends ] trouverait belle!
Marguerite, ce n'est plus toi,
ce n'est plus ton visage!
Non! c'est la fille d'un roi,
qu'on salue au passage!

[translation]

MARGUERITE

Is it truly Marguerite, then?
Is it you?
Tell me true, tell me true,
tell me, tell me, tell me true!
Ah! could he see me now,
here, decked like this, I vow,
he surely would mistake me,
and for a noble lady take me!
Ah! he surely would mistake me,
and for a noble lady take me!
He surely would mistake me,
and for a noble lady take me!
Marguerite, this is not you,
that bright face there reflected
must belong to a queen,
whom I greet as I pass her!

[Begin Page 23]

Band 4

Act III. Final episode: "Il t'aime" ... almost to end of act

Suzanne Adams (s), Marguerite

Albert Alvarez (t), Faust

Edouard De Reszke (bs), Méphistophélès

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Luigi Mancinelli

February 4, 1903

[Glackens 49. This cylinder is cracked and badly warped.]

Band 5

Act III: Final episode: "Il t'aime" ...to end of act

Fritzi Scheff (s), Marguerite

Thomas Salignac (t), Faust

Marcel Journet (bs), Méphistophélès

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Luigi Mancinelli

February 4, 1903

[Glackens 62. "Feb 14"; this is the only Faust performance on February 14 during the Mapleson years, and the speed matches Band 6, q.v. ]

Both these cylinders cover the same material--Marguerite's speech at the window (heard, unbeknownst to her, by Faust and Méphistophélès) and the end of the Garden Scene. The first one does not quite reach the final chord.

[original]

MARGUERITE

[Toutes les voix de la nature
semblent me répéter en choeur:]
"Il t'aime! Il t'aime!"
Ah, qu'il est doux de vivre!
Le ciel me sourit, l'air m'enivre,
l'air m'enivre!
Est-ce de plaisir et d'amour
que la feuille tremble et palpite?
Demain, demain!
Ah! presse ton retour,
cher bien-aimé! Viens! Viens!

FAUST (rushing to the window and grasping her hand)
Marguerite!

MARGUERITE
Ah!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Hein! (Marguerite, overcome, allows her head to fall on Faust's shoulder. Méphistophélès opens the door of the garden and departs, laughing derisively. The curtain falls.)

[translation]

MARGUERITE

All nature's sounds
repeat in chorus together,
"He loves thee! He loves thee!"
Ah, how sweet is life to me!
The heavens smile, another world it seems,
another world it seems.
Is it from the very ecstasy of love
that the leaves tremble?
Tomorrow, tomorrow,
haste thee to return,
oh dear one! Yes, come! come!

FAUST (rushing to the window and grasping her hand)
Marguerite!

MARGUERITE
Ah!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Ho! ho! (Marguerite, overcome, allows her head to fall on Faust's shoulder. Méphistophélès opens the door of the garden and departs, laughing derisively. The curtain falls.)

raster Band 6   [Click to Listen]

Act IV: Soldiers' Chorus excerpts :

(a) "Gloire immortelle des nos aïeux" ... "L'amour nous rit, l'amour [nous fête]"

(b) "Gloire immortelle" ...almost to end of chorus

Metropolitan Opera Chorus and Orchestra--

Luigi Mancinelli

February 14, 1903

[Slip; Glackens 17.]

After recording the opening pages of the chorus of returning soldiers (sung in Italian). Mapleson stops his machine, resuming at the recapitulation of the opening theme; even so, he still runs out of time before the end of the piece.

[original]

CHORUS

(a)
O gloria cinta d'allor, d'allor,
non hai rivale nel nostro cor,
dispiega l'ale sul vincitor,
accendi nei cor,
accendi nei cor novello valor.
Per te, patria adorata, morte sfidiam,
per te, patria adorata, morte sfidiam,
te sol guidi in campo il nostro acciar,
per te pugniam,
per te pugniam, per te trionfiam.
O gloria cinta d'allor, d'allor,
non hai rivale nel nostro cor,
dispiega l'ale sul vincitor,
accendi nei cor novello valor.
Ver le maggion or ci affrettiam.
ci aspettan la, fatta è la pace!
Or ci affrettiam, aspettan la,
ver la maggion or ci affrettiam!
Ognuno quì ci abbraccierà,
amor c'invita, amor [ci aspetta...]
(b)
O gloria cinta d'allor, d'allor,
non hai rivale nel nostro cor,
dispiega l'ale sul vincitor,
accendi nei cor novello valor!
Accendi nei cor, accendi nei cor
novello valor!
Accendi nei cor, accendi nei cor,
accendi nei cor novello valor!

[translation]

CHORUS

Glory to those who in battle fall,
their bright deeds we can with pride recall,
may we, then, honour and fame acquire,
their glorious deeds,
their glorious deeds our hearts will inspire!
For that dear native land where we first drew breath,
her sons, at her command, proudly brave e'en death.
At their sacred demand who on us depend,
our swords we will draw,
our swords we will draw, their rights to defend.
Glory to those who in battle fall,
their bright deeds we can with pride recall,
may we, then, honour and fame acquire,
their glorious deeds our hearts will inspire!
Homeward our steps we now will turn.
joy and peace await us there!
On, on at once, nor loiter here,
homeward our steps we now will turn.
On, then, our lov'd ones to embrace,
affection calls, fond love doth summon us...
Glory to those who in battle fall,
their bright deeds we can with pride recall,
may we, then, honour and fame acquire,
their glorious deeds our hearts will inspire!
Their glorious deeds, their glorious deeds
our hearts will inspire!
Their glorious deeds, their glorious deeds,
their glorious deeds our hearts will inspire!

Band 7

Act IV: Duel Scene excerpt and beginning of Valentin's Death: "[Mé]daille maudite" ... "la mort en face trop souvent"

Albert Alvarez (t), Faust

Giuseppe Campanari (b), Valentin

Edouard De Reszke (bs), Méphistophélès

Mathilde Bauermeister (s), Marthe

Metropolitan Opera Chorus and Orchestra --

Luigi Mancinelli

February 18, 1903

[Glackens 41. This exceptionally long cylinder -- playing nearly three minutes -- was recorded at the very slow speed of 117.30 rpm.]

The duel follows Méphistophélès' mocking serenade at Marguerite's window, which brings out her brother Valentin. Mapleson's recording begins as the enraged Valentin tears from his neck the silver medallion Marguerite had given him when he went off to war. It then continues to the beginnings of his death scene; the entering chorus sings in Italian (as. presumably, does Mathilde Bauermeister as Marthe).

[original]

VALENTIN

[Mé]daille maudite!
Je ne veux plus de ton secours!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS (aside)
Tu t'en repentiras,
tu t'en repentiras! Simultaneous singing begins

FAUST
Terrible et frémissant
il glace mon courage!
Terrible et frémissant
il glace mon courage!
Dois-je verser le sang,
du frère que j'outrage?
Dois-je verser le sang,
verser le sang
du frère que j'outrage?

VALENTIN
Redouble, o Dieu puissant,
ma force et mon courage!
Redouble, o Dieu puissant,
ma force et mon courage!
Permets que dans son sang
je lave mon outrage!
Dieu puissant, Dieu puissant!
Redouble mon courage!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
De son air menaçant,
de son aveugle rage,
de son air menaçant,
de son aveugle rage,
moi, je ris!
Mon bras puissant
va detourner l'orage,
mon bras puissant, mon bras
va detourner l'orage! Simultaneous singing ends

VALENTIN
En garde! et défends-toi!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS (to Faust)
Serrez-vous contre moi!
Et poussez seulement, cher docteur!
Moi, je pare. (They fight. Valentin falls.)

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Voici notre héros étendu sur le sable!
Au large maintenant! au large! (Exit, dragging Faust after him)

MARTHE & CHORUS (entering with lighted torches)
Per di quà venga ognun,
si batton nella via!
Un di lor cadde la!
Ahi, meschin, steso è là,
egli respira ancor, rimuover lo vedeste.
Presto avanziam, soccorerlo convien.
Ci accostiam, soccorerlo convien.

VALENTIN
Merci, merci!
De vos plaintes, faites-moi grace!
J'ai vu, morbleu, la mort en face
trop souvent [pour en avoir peur!]

[translation]

VALENTIN

Accursed gift,
I'll no more of thee!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS (aside)
You'll repent it,
you'll repent it! Simultaneous singing begins

FAUST
Awesome and threatening,
he chills my courage!
Awesome and threatening,
he chills my courage!
Must I spill the blood
of the brother I have offended?
Must I spill the blood,
spill the blood
of the brother I have offended?

[Begin Page 24]

VALENTIN
Reinforce, o God all-powerful,
my strength and my courage!
Reinforce, o God all-powerful,
my strength and my courage!
Grant that in his blood
I shall cleanse my rage!
God all-powerful, God all-powerful!
Reinforce my courage!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
At his menacing mien,
at his blind rage,
At his menacing mien,
at his blind rage,
I merely laugh!
My potent arm
will turn away the storm,
my potent arm, my arm
will turn away the storm! Simultaneous singing ends

VALENTIN
Come on, defend yourself!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS (to Faust)
Stand near me.
and only attack him:
I'll take care of parrying! (They fight. Valentin falls.)

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Behold our hero, lifeless on the ground!
Come, we must hence--quick, fly! (Exit, dragging Faust after him)

MARTHE & CHORUS (entering with lighted torches)
Hither, hither, come this way,
they're fighting here hard by!
See, one has fallen!
The unhappy man lies prostrate there.
Ah! he moves--yes, he still breathes;
quick, then, draw nigh
to raise and succor him!

VALENTIN
Thanks! thanks!
'Tis useless, these vain laments!
I have gazed on death
too often to fear it!

Band 8

Act V: Trio excerpt : "Si vous tardez encor" ... "au sein des cieux! (verse 2)"

Nellie Melba (s), Marguerite

Albert Saléza (t), Faust

Edouard De Reszke (bs), Méphistophélès

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Luigi Mancinelli

March 4, 1901

[Snake; Glackens 83.]

Band 9

Act V: Trio: "Anges purs" (verse 1)...to conclusion of Trio; encore: "Anges purs" (verse 3)..."à toi, pardonne!"

Nellie Melba (s), Marguerite (?)

Albert Saléza (t), Faust (?)

Pol Plançon (bs), Méphistophélès (?)

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Luigi Mancinelli(?)

March 28, 1901 (?)

[Our identification of this undocumented cylinder is conjectural. In the opinion of John Stratton and Philip L. Miller, the Marguerite is Melba (an assumption supported by the findings of Voiceprint Laboratories of Somerville, New Jersey, to whom we sent samples of an identical phrase from this cylinder and from Band 8, firmly ascribed to Melba). The following dates are possible:
1/4/01 Melba, J. & E. De Reszke/Mancinelli
2/26m/01 Melba, Saléza, E. De Reszke/Mancinelli
3/28/01 Melba, Saléza, Plançon/Mancinelli
(3/4/01 is excluded, because this cylinder overlaps with Band 8, definitely from that date.) Stratton and Miller incline to the March 28 cast--also the occasion on which Mapleson recorded Melba singing the "Jewel Song" (Band 2 above).

A cylinder from the New York Public Library group, this was transferred to a lacquer disc at the Library of Congress in February 1941. When John Stratton and David Hall examined the cylinders in early 1967, they found this one badly cracked, but not beyond re-assemblage. The first part of Band 9 is the result, comprising the complete trio. The encore is taken from the Library of Congress lacquer; despite the change in sound quality, we have maintained time continuity during the applause between the trio and the encore. The original cylinder, as far as it goes, is much superior in definition and tonal body to the lacquer transfer.]

Band 10

Act V: Trio excerpt : "[Dieu bon, je suis à toi.] pardonne!" (verse 1) ... to conclusion of Trio

Suzanne Adams (s), Marguerite

Albert Alvarez (t), Faust

Edouard De Reszke (bs), Méphistophélès

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Luigi Mancinelli

February 4, 1903

[Slip; Glackens 63. At the end of this cylinder is found a fragment of the "Alleluia" from Le Cid (see Side 12/Band 5); the distortion of this recording may well arise from faulty erasure of that earlier one. To minimize a persistent tick, this cylinder was filtered narrowly.]

[Begin Page 25]

Band 11

Act V: Trio and Apotheosis excerpts :

(a) "[Anges purs, anges] radieux" (verse 2) ... to end of Trio

(b) "Jugée! Sauvée!" ... "Christ est [ressuscité!]"

Emma Calvé (s), Marguerite

Andreas Dippel (t), Faust

Marcel Journet (bs), Méphistophélès

Metropolitan Opera Chorus and Orchestra--

Armando Seppilli

February 15, 1902

[Glackens 71: "Feb XX 1902," with "15?" inserted later. The only Faust performance during February 1902 took place on the 15th, and the speed matches Calvé's "Jewel Song" of the same date. Mapleson briefly stopped his machine after the Trio, resuming for the Apotheosis. On the first IRCC LP reissue, L-7006, the Marguerite of this recording was listed as Melba; the earlier 78 issue and the later LP are correctly attributed.]

Band 12

Act V: Apotheosis excerpt : "Christ vient de renaître" ...to end of chorus

Metropolitan Opera Chorus and Orchestra--

Luigi Mancinelli?

1903?

[On the cylinder, this blends into the Nordica-Anthes Siegfried finale, January 19, 1903 (Side 11/Band 5c). 1903 seems the more likely season on the basis of sound quality. The speed matches no other Faust cylinder, though it is near to those made on February 4, 1903, featuring Suzanne Adams. Mancinelli conducted all performances in 1902-03 and most in 1900-01; the others during the Mapleson years were led by Armando Seppilli.]

The cylinders from the opera's final scene overlap, their beginning and ending points indicated in the libretto. The first starts with Méphistophélès urging Faust to delay no longer in taking Marguerite from the prison:

[original]

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS

Alerte! alerte!
ou vous êtes perdus!
[ Band 8 begins→] Si vous tardez encor,
je ne m'en mèle plus!

MARGUERITE
Le démon! Le démon!
Le vois-tu? la, dans l'ombre,
fixant sur nous son oeil de feu!
Que nous veut-il?
Chasse-le du Saint-lieu!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Quittons ce lieu sombre,
la jour est levé.
De leur pied sonore
j'entend nos chevaux frapper le pavé.
Viens! sauvons-la!
Peut-être il en est temps encore!

MARGUERITE
Mon Dieu, protégez-moi!

FAUST
Viens! Simultaneous singing begins

MARGUERITE
Mon Dieu, je vous implore!

FAUST
Fuyons! peut-être il en est temps encore! Simultaneous singing ends

MARGUERITE (kneeling)
[ Band 9 begins→] Anges purs, anges radieux,
portez mon âme au sein des cieux!
Dieu juste, à toi je m'abandonne!
Dieu bon, je suis à toi, [ Band 10 begins → ] pardonne!
Anges purs, anges radieux,
portez mon âme au sein des cieux!

FAUST
Viens, suis-moi, je le veux!

MARGUERITE
Anges purs, anges [ Band 11 begins→ ] radieux,
portez mon âme au sein des cieux! [ ← Band 8 ends ]

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Hâtons-nous! Simultaneous singing begins

MARGUERITE
Dieu juste, à toi je m'abandonne!
Dieu juste, à toi je m'abandonne!
Je suis à toi, Dieu bon, pardonne!

FAUST
Viens! suis-moi!
Viens! suis-moi!
Suis-moi! viens, je le veux!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
L'heure sonne!
Déja le jour envahit,
envahit les cieux! Simultaneous singing endsSimultaneous singing begins

MARGUERITE
[ Band 9 encore begins→ ] Anges purs! anges radieux!
Portez mon âme au sein des cieux!
Dieu juste, à toi je m'abandonne!
Dieu bon, je suis à toi!--pardonne! [ ←Band 9 encore breaks off ]
Anges purs! anges radieux!
Portez mon âme au sein des cieux!

FAUST
Viens! viens! quittons ces lieux,
déja le jour envahit les cieux!
Viens! viens! C'est moi,
c'est moi qui te l'ordonne!
Viens! viens! quittons ces lieux,
déja le jour envahit les cieux!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Hâtons-nous, hâtons-nous de quitter ces lieux,
déja le jour envahit les cieux!
Suis nos pas, suis nos pas,
viens, ou je t'abandonne!
Hâtons-nous, hâtons-nous de quitter ces lieux,
déja le jour envahit les cieux! Simultaneous singing ends

[Band 9 stops for applause, then encores. Band 10 ends. Band 11 stops and resumes after the following bracketed passage.]

FAUST
[Marguerite!

MARGUERITE
Pourquoi ce regard menaçant?

FAUST
Marguerite!

MARGUERITE
Pourquoi ces mains rouges de sang!
Va! tu me fais horreur!] (She falls.)

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
[Band 11 resumes→] Jugée!

ÇHORUS OF ANGELS
E salva!
Il nume risuscitò!
Egli rinasce ancora!
[ Band 12 begins→ ] Pace e felicità.
a ognun che l'adora! ecc.

[translation]

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS

Away, then! away, then!
or you surely are lost!
If you delay longer,
not even my power can save you!

MARGUERITE
Do you see the demon
crouching there in the shadows?
His deadly glance is fixed on us!
What does he want?
Drive him from these sacred walls!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Away! let us leave this spot,
the dawn has appeared.
I hear the fiery chargers,
loudly pawing the ground.
Hasten! Perchance
there is yet time to save her!

MARGUERITE
O heaven, help me!

FAUST
Come! Simultaneous singing begins

MARGUERITE
My Lord, I implore your aid!

FAUST
Away! perchance there is yet time! Simultaneous singing ends

MARGUERITE (kneeling)
Holy angels, in heaven blessed,
my spirit longs with you to rest!
Great heaven, grant pardon, I implore thee,
for soon I shall appear before thee!
Holy angels, in heaven blessed,
my spirit longs with you to rest!

FAUST
Marguerite! Follow me, I implore!

MARGUERITE
Holy angels, in heaven blessed,
my spirit longs with you to rest!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
We must hurry! Simultaneous singing begins

MARGUERITE
Great heaven, grant pardon, I implore thee,
Great heaven, grant pardon, I implore thee,
for soon I shall appear before thee!

FAUST
Come, follow me!
Come, follow me!
Come, I wish it!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
It is time,
already the day invades,
invades the heavens! Simultaneous singing endsSimultaneous singing begins

MARGUERITE
Holy angels, in heaven blessed,
my spirit longs with you to rest!
Great heaven, grant pardon, I implore thee,
for soon I shall appear before thee!
Holy angels, in heaven blessed,
my spirit longs with you to rest!

FAUST
Come! Come! let us leave this place!
Already the day invades the heavens!
Come! Come! it is I,
it is I who command you!
Come! Come! let us leave this place!
Already the day invades the heavens!

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Let us hasten, hasten to leave this place,
already the day invades the heavens!
Follow our steps, follow our steps,
come, or I will abandon you!
Let us hasten, hasten to leave this place,
already the day invades the heavens! Simultaneous singing ends

FAUST
Marguerite!

MARGUERITE
Why that glance with anger fraught?

FAUST
Marguerite!

MARGUERITE
What blood is that which stains your hands?
Away! the sight of you causes me horror! (She falls.)

MÉPHISTOPHÉLÈS
Condemned!

ÇHORUS OF ANGELS
She is saved!
Christ is arisen!
He is reborn!
Peace and happiness
to all who worship him. etc.

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     Program Notes    Table of Contents      Meyerbeer: LES HUGUENOTS