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     Bizet: CARMEN    Table of Contents      Donizetti: LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR

The Mapleson Cylinders - Program Notes

- Libretti
- Donizetti: LA FILLE DU RÉGIMENT


Donizetti: LA FILLE DU RÉGIMENT

The Metropolitan premiere of La Fille du Régiment took place on January 6, 1902; according to H. E. Krehbiel, Marcella Sembrich had "one of the prettiest triumphs of her American career." The opera was performed three times that season and six times the next; Mapleson's recordings come from the third performance in 1903. In those years, Fille was considered too brief for a full evening's entertainment; the 1902 performances were followed by Cavalleria Rusticana, those in 1903 usually by Pagliacci (although on the evening that Mapleson recorded, Pagliacci was played first--see Side 6/Bands 6-7), but also once by Ethel Smyth's Der Wald. After 1903, the opera was not heard at the Met until revivals for Frieda Hempel during the First World War, Lily Pons during the Second, and Joan Sutherland in the Seventies.

Band 3

Act I: Duet excerpt : "À cet aveu si tendre, mon coeur" ... "que perdre nos amours"

Marcella Sembrich (s), Marie

Thomas Sallgnac (t), Tonio

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Phillippe Flon

January 30, 1903

[Glackens 15.]

Marie, "the daughter of the regiment," was found as a child on a battlefield, her parents unknown. Recently, her life was saved by the Tyrolean youth Tonio, who has agreed to become a grenadier in order to obtain the regiment's permission to marry Marie. The recording presents the last part of their love duet. (It is followed on the original cylinder by the last strain of Arditi's Parla Vals, which Sembrich habitually sang at the end of La Fille du Régiment; see Band 10 on this side.)

[original]

TONIO

À cet aveu si tendre,
non, son coeur en ce jour
ne peut pas se défendre
de croire à mon amour!
Je t'aime, Marie, Simultaneous singing begins
je t'aime pour toujours, toujours!

MARIE
De cet aveu si tendre... Simultaneous singing ends

TONIO
Plutôt perdre la vie Simultaneous singing begins
que perdre nos amours...

MARIE
non, mon coeur en ce jour... Simultaneous singing ends

TONIO
nos amours, nos amours, nos amours! Simultaneous singing begins

MARIE
Sur le coeur de Marie,
Tonio, compte toujours!

TONIO
Qui, je t'aime, Marie,
je t'aime, et pour toujours! Simultaneous singing ends

BOTH
Plutôt perdre la vie
que perdre nos amours! etc.

MARIE
Plutôt la vie...

TONIO
Plutôt la vie...

BOTH
Plutôt perdre la vie
que perdre nos amours!

MARIE
Plutôt la vie...

TONIO
Plutôt la vie...

BOTH
Plutôt perdre la vie
que perdre nos amours! etc.

[translation]

TONIO

To such a tender avowal,
no, today her heart
cannot avoid
believing in my love!
I love you, Marie. Simultaneous singing begins
I love you always, always!

MARIE
By such a tender avowal... Simultaneous singing ends

TONIO
I'd rather die Simultaneous singing begins
than to lose our love...

MARIE
no, today my heart... Simultaneous singing ends

TONIO
our love, our love, our love! Simultaneous singing begins

MARIE
On Marie's heart,
Tonio, you may always rely!

TONIO
Yes, I love you, Marie,
I love you, and forever! Simultaneous singing ends

BOTH
I'd rather die
than to lose our love!

MARIE
I'd rather die...

TONIO
I'd rather die...

BOTH
I'd rather die
than to lose our love!

MARIE
I'd rather die...

TONIO
I'd rather die...

BOTH
I'd rather die
than to lose our love! etc.

Band 4

Act II: Rataplan excerpt : "En avant" ... to end of number

Marcella Sembrich (s), Marie

Marie Van Cauteren (ms), Marquise

Charles Gilibert (b), Sulpice

Metropolitan Opera Orchestra--Phillippe Flon

January 30, 1903

[Glackens 38.]

Marie has been discovered and claimed by her aunt, the Marquise of Birkenfeld, at whose castle she is taught aristocratic manners. In the midst of a singing lesson, she and Sergeant Sulpice break out into the regimental song, to the dismay of the Marquise.

[original]

SULPICE and MARIE

En avant, en avant, en avant!
En avant! rataplan plan plan!
En avant, en avant, en avant!
C'est le refrain du regiment!

MARQUISE
Ah! quelle horreur!

SULPICE and MARIE
En avant, en avant, en avant!

MARQUISE
Est-il possible?

SULPICE and MARIE
En avant! rataplan plan plan!
En avant, en avant, en avant!
C'est ie refrain du regiment! ( They continue in this vein, with the Marquise further expressing--in an inner part--her revulsion at the military song, though she does seem to be carried along by its infectious rhythm. )

[translation]

SULPICE and MARIE

Forward, march! Forward, march! Forward, march!
Forward, march! Rataplan plan plan!
Forward, march! Forward, march! Forward, march!
That's the regimental refrain!

MARQUISE
How horrible!

SULPICE and MARIE
Forward, march! Forward, march! Forward, march!

MARQUISE
Can this really be happening?

SULPICE and MARIE
Forward, march! Rataplan plan plan!
Forward, march! Forward, march! Forward, march!
That's the regimental refrain! ( They continue in this vein, with the Marquise further expressing--in an inner part--her revulsion at the military song, though she does seem to be carried along by its infectious rhythm. )


     Bizet: CARMEN    Table of Contents      Donizetti: LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR